Hong Kong’s Anti-extradition Bill Protests in 2019: Bridging Colonial, Philosophical and Sociological Analysis

Conference: AAS-in-Asia2020 (AAS-in-Asia2020)
Title: Hong Kong’s Anti-extradition Bill Protests in 2019: Bridging Colonial, Philosophical and Sociological Analysis
Stream: Political Sciences
Presentation Type: Panel Presentation
Panelists:
Leung Chau, University of Sydney, Australia (organizer, discussant)
William Chan, University of Warwick, United Kingdom (chair, presenter)
Sin-yui Chan, Lingnan University, Hong Kong (presenter)
Yeuk-nam Ng, Lingnan Univeristy, Hong Kong (presenter)
Samson Yuen, Lingnan University, Hong Kong (discussant)

Abstract:

The protests in Hong Kong fueled by the 2019 extradition bill mark a paradigm shift of both local and global social movements. For one thing, the protests represent the rising localism of Hongkongers and their diminishing faith in "One country, two systems"; for another, the protests exhibit new strategies of resistance, many of which were previously deemed unacceptable by the mainstream public opinion. Some of these strategies are even embraced by protestors in other places, one of them notably being Catalonia. The recent protests in Hong Kong, in short, are closely relevant to the future of the city and the social movements elsewhere. It is therefore worthwhile to ask: what explains, justifies, and can be learnt from the anti-extradition bill protests?

In response to the question, this panel aggregates the wisdom of researchers in the areas of colonial studies, political philosophy and sociology. Chau studies how the incompatibility between the Eastern and Western ways of governing has led to the political dilemmas of Hong Kong today. He also looks at how the demonstrations in the city have inspired new forms of resistance in other countries. Chan attempts to refute three common criticisms about the uncivil resistance in Hong Kong, whereas he notes a danger of indiscriminatorily supporting all uncivil forms of protests. Finally, Chan and Ng, by discourse analysis, consider how the suicide notes of Hong Kong protestors provide a context for shared grievance and visualize a public performance of a nested politicized collective identity.