Projecting the Ideas, the Voice and the Space: Translingual and Transmedial Cultural Practises in Modern China

Conference: AAS-in-Asia2020 (AAS-in-Asia2020)
Title: Projecting the Ideas, the Voice and the Space: Translingual and Transmedial Cultural Practises in Modern China
Stream: Literature
Presentation Type: Panel Presentation
Authors:
Shao Dong, The Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (organizer, presenter)
Jianhua Chen, Fudan University, China (chair, discussant)
Shu Chen, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong (presenter)
Ruoze Huang, Xiamen University, China (presenter)
Ouyang Kaibing, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (presenter)

Abstract:

This panel seeks to offer a new perspective of the translingual practices of 20th century China by examining the prominent role that medium play in shaping the variegated modes of projection and reception. Through an analysis of both high-brow and popular literature and culture, this panel presents four diverse yet closely interrelated explorations to shed light on the process of mediation and the enactment of local agency in the translational process.

Through delineating the cross-cultural renditions of American Novel Mothers Cry (1930) as in literary text, radio drama, and Cantonese film, Hazel Shu Chen explores the female voice and agency’s reenactment in the travelling narrative to understand how film, as the terminus of the adaptation circuit (re)mediates the visions and voices embedded in its predecessors. Venturing into the Shanghai Cosmopolitanism of 1910s, Shao Dong illustrates the Great World Daily as a projected textual space of the Great World Entertainment Center, which was a Heterotopia that juxtaposed worldwide scenes architecturally and environmentally. Huang Ruoze analyzes how Zheng Zhenduo’ translations of Greek mythology constitute a field of social criticism and ideological debates in the 1920s and 30s. Lastly, Ouyang Kaibin explores the Icarus-inspired artist subjectivity of modern China using the Greek-phile writer Mu Xin as a case study.

Taken together, all four papers spell out the role that medium play and how ideas, voice and space are projected in the translingual practices of modern China.