The Politics of The Everyday: Discursive and Communicative Negotiation between Control, Violence, and Resistance in Modern Chinese Literature and Media

Conference: AAS-in-Asia2020 (AAS-in-Asia2020)
Title: The Politics of The Everyday: Discursive and Communicative Negotiation between Control, Violence, and Resistance in Modern Chinese Literature and Media
Stream: Literature
Presentation Type: Panel Presentation
Authors:
Lina Qu, Michigan State University, United States (organizer, chair, presenter)
Xiqing Zheng, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, China (presenter, discussant)
Nan Wang, University of Hawaii at Manoa, United States (presenter)
Jia Xu, University of Hawaii at Manoa, United States (presenter)

Abstract:

The past few decades have witnessed China undergoing waves of social and cultural restructuring against shifting dynamics of political and economic systems, which consequently results in drastic reshaping of everyday life experienced by every social stratum. To navigate the shifting scenes of the everyday, modern Chinese literature and media prioritize the task of negotiating individual lives with the imposition of political and economic systems. This panel probes the implications and consequences of the swiftly changing daily scenes through dissecting literary and cultural representations in fiction, poetry, and Chinese cyberspace. Discursive and communicative strategies are undertaken in order to expose, satirize, but also, disguise, and circumvent the intrusive infiltration into everyday life. Negotiation and compromise between control, violence, and resistance showcase the discursive and communicative strategies underlying the politics of the everyday.

This panel comprises four individual papers focusing on varied historical moments and diversified literary genres and media. Xiqing Zheng’s paper investigates the debate on queerbaiting in Chinese online fan community and its negotiation with the ever-tightening governmental censorship and the homophobic social environment. Lina Qu’s paper examines the mechanical and posthuman symbols and imageries conjured up by Zheng Xiaoqiong’s poems on factory lives of Chinese women migrant workers in light of Donna Haraway’s cyborg feminism. Nan Wang’s paper explores the tension between the ordinariness of language and the violence interrupting everyday scenes in Shuang Xuetao’s work Moses On the Plain. Finally, Jia Xu’s paper interprets Chen Yingzhen’s Comedy of Tang Qian in The Literature Quarterly to expose social implications of misusing western theories in Chinese intellectuals’ daily life.