Bringing Puzzles Together: Revisiting the Records on the Relations of Tibet and the Neighbors in the 17-18th Century

Conference: AAS-in-Asia2020 (AAS-in-Asia2020)
Title: Bringing Puzzles Together: Revisiting the Records on the Relations of Tibet and the Neighbors in the 17-18th Century
Stream: History
Presentation Type: Panel Presentation
Authors:
Soyoung Choi, Seoul National University, South Korea (organizer)
Hojung Lee, Gangneung-Wonju National University, South Korea (presenter)
Jubong Choi, Seoul National University, South Korea (presenter)
Sungje Yoon, Seoul National University, South Korea (presenter)
Hyun-jung Kim, Seoul National University, South Korea (presenter)
Daeyeon Yook, Seoul National University, South Korea (presenter)

Abstract:

It is said that historians believe in the Evil Nature Principle when they survey the historical records of the past. Historical records are usually written neatly in books which look old and trustful but the writings were strongly influenced by the authors’ origin, religion and other personal traits. Therefore, historians read between the lines carefully and even look at the records upside down. The most popular method is to bring records on same topic by different authors and compare them line by line. This is useful and effective regardless of periods and areas for historical research but the method is almost indispensable in the study of the history of Central Eurasia since the seventeenth century. It was a tripartite game; the Manchus held sway politically, the Tibetans took power spiritually and the Mongols in between did not quietly stand aside. Sometimes the three waged wars, sometimes formed coalitions and sometimes even built the priest-patron relationships, forming a triangle. For the historical events happened among them, their records were often disparate with each other and sometimes one mentioned the events while the others kept silent.
This panel is going to survey several topics regarding Tibet and its neighbors in 17-18th century by examining sources of different authors and languages in order to bring the puzzles together to shed more light on the subjects.