Methodologies of Migration and Care Research at the Crossroads of Asia: What We Can Learn From Paired Interviews

Conference: AAS-in-Asia2020 (AAS-in-Asia2020)
Title: Methodologies of Migration and Care Research at the Crossroads of Asia: What We Can Learn From Paired Interviews
Stream: Geography
Presentation Type: Panel Presentation
Authors:
Kellynn Wee, Asia Research Institute, Singapore (organizer, presenter, discussant)
Kristel Acedera, Asia Research Institute, Singapore (presenter, chair)
Jian An Liew, Asia Research Institute, Singapore (presenter)


Abstract:

While the labour of care and caregiving necessarily animates our world, it is still often a practice that is both unrecognised and undervalued. In Asia, care is a practice intimately linked to both migration and power: we outsource care to migrant women from other countries, rearrange conventional patterns of familial care when parents go abroad to work, and reconfigure care and parenting labour within highly mobile families who might split and reunite across time and space. This panel brings together scholars working on themes of paid and unpaid caregiving in Asia by foregrounding a methodology that has been used across all three projects: paired interviews. Also known as dyadic interviews or joint interviews, this methodology commonly refers to the process of interviewing two people at the same time in order to elicit co-constructed accounts about a particular topic. While this is a technique more often used in health research, the projects discussed in this panel applies the method to the discipline of geography. They extend the conventional use of this methodology by applying it across various care relationships that embody different power dynamics, including domestic worker/elderly care recipient; husband/wife; and caregiver/left-behind child of a migrant parent. What can paired interviews tell us about the relationality of care? How do paired interviews perform, reproduce or challenge presumed dynamics of power between the members of each pair? How do paired interviews foster accounts of convergence and/or conflict? Ultimately, this panel aims to extend conversations about the methodologies of migration and care research in Asia.